Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference on Sustainable Civil Engineering Cape Town, South Africa.

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Day 1 :

OMICS International Civil Engineering 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Charles-Darwin Annan photo
Biography:

Dr. Annan is an associate professor of civil engineering at Laval University in Canada. He is affiliated as a researcher with the strategic inter-university Research Centre for Structures under Extreme Loading (CEISCE) and the Research Center on Aluminium (REGAL), where he is conducting a number of different research on sustainable civil infrastructure, and the development of resilient structural systems meeting multiple performance objectives. Dr. Annan was nominated for the 2014 Mitacs Award of Exceptional Leadership, which recognizes excellence in collaboration and highlights superior research achievements. He is currently serving in a number of technical committees, including the ASCE Infrastructure Resilience Division Technical Committee. Dr. Annan currently chairs the Steel Structures subcommittee of the CSCE, and has been serving as an editorial board member of Structural Engineering International of the IABSE.

Abstract:

Metallizing is evolving as a versatile coating solution for steel bridge elements and has seen increased recognition by multiple transportation agencies, including the U.S. Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the Canadian ministère des Transports du Québec. Metalizing is a term commonly used to describe the practice of thermally spraying molten zinc, aluminium or zinc/aluminium alloy on surfaces of exposed steel elements to provide both physical barrier and effective sacrificial protection through galvanic action. In order to derive the maximum benefits of metallizing, bridge designers need to know the slip resistance of metallized faying surfaces required to develop slip-critical connections in the bridge structure. This helps to eliminate the current labor-intensive and time-consuming practice of masking off all connection faying surfaces to preserve their conditions prepared in accordance to prevailing design standards. Therefore, the ability to design for and supply coated faying surfaces is an important option, and achieving a reliable slip resistance is an essential variable in this option. This presentation will discuss results of both short and long-term studies performed to characterize the slip resistance of metallized faying surfaces used with high-strength bolted slip-critical connections in bridges.

  • Civil Engineering Materials

Session Introduction

Ikotun B.D.

University of South Africa, South Africa

Title: General Overview of the Effect of FA-β-CD composite on concrete behaviour
Biography:

Bolanle Deborah Ikotun is a researcher and a Senior lecturer in Civil Engineering department, University of South Africa. She has DIng (waiting graduation), MSc (Eng) and B.Eng degrees in Civil Engineering from the University of Johannesburg, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa and The Federal University of Technology Akure, Nigeria respectively. Her research interests are in concrete mix design, concrete structural and durability properties testing, chemical deterioration of concrete, mechanical testing of concrete, concrete quality optimization techniques and investigation of extenders as they affect mortar and concrete properties. She has authored and co-authored articles in peer-reviewed conference proceedings and reputable journals. She has served as a reviewer for reputable journals and presently supervising postgraduate students.

Abstract:

This study looked into the possibility of increasing the utilisation of fly ash (FA) in concrete technology. FA, being an industrial waste that is in abundance in South Africa and a source of environmental pollution is presently being used minimally in the construction industry. The study on its interaction with cyclodextrin (an enzymatic modification of starch) for possible increased usage in concrete operations was done. Different South African fly ashes were characterised and their compatibility with cyclodextrin to form a useful composite was studied by XRD, SEM and FT-IR. Composite samples were synthesized following two different procedures. Since these are novel composites, indicative tests were performed on strength (compressive and split tensile) and durability (oxygen permeability, sorptivity and porosity) on mortar/concrete made with FA (30% of cement by mass) and fly ash-β-cyclodextrin (FA-β-CD) composite, that further guided the research. Based on the indicative tests results, a possible optimum composite synthesis method and percentages of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) in the mixtures were identified. These optimal parameters were used to study the effect of FA, β-CD and (FA-β-CD) composite on cement paste hydration (XRD, SEM and FT-IR), rheology (viscosity and setting time), concrete strength (compressive and split tensile) and concrete durability (oxygen permeability, sorptivity, porosity and chloride conductivity). In general, concrete’s hydration products were modified with FA–cyclodextrin composite, which boosted the performance of FA in concrete. The composite improved FA concrete’s early compressive strength, permeability, sorptivity, porosity and chloride conductivity.

Biography:

Mr. A J Shah has completed his M. E. (CIVIL) specialization in Structure in 1985 from S. G. U., Gujarat, India. He is the Associate Professor of Applied Mechanics Department. He has published more than 16 papers Journal & International Conference.

Abstract:

The use of roller compacted concrete (RCC) in pavements are widely used for a variety of industrial and heavy-duty pavement application that involve low speed traffic. The aim of this investigation is to evaluate the effect of fly ash and triangular polyester fibre on mechanical properties of RCC mixtures addressed. Optimal water content value for the maximum dry density of each RCC mixture is one of main concerns for mix design. In this study, effect of triangular polyester fibre used as 0%, 0.25%, 50% and 0.75% per one cum with fly ash 15%, 30% and 45% by cement weight as a partial cement replacement on optimum water content, mechanical properties was investigated. The optimum water content required of those mixtures was determined using nuclear density gauge meter. As the result of the experimental study, it has been observed that the use of fly ash and triangular polyester fibre in RCC mixtures decreases and increases water requirement and water-cement ratio respectively. The mechanical properties of RCC mix with TPF decreases due to water requirement increase. RCC mixtures with fly ash 30% partial replacement of cement and TPF at 90 days curing should be designed to fulfill the requirement of strength and workability.

DARSHAK RAIJIWALA

Sardar Vallavbhai National Insitute of Technology, India

Title: High performance green concrete
Biography:

Dr. D.B RAIJIWALA has completed his PhD at SVNIT.(This institute is a central government institution of INDIA, and also considered as institute of national importance). He is the Professor of Applied Mechanics Department since 41 years. Area of specialization is Geopolymer concrete & Bacterial concrete.

Abstract:

This paper aims at making and studying the different properties of Geopolymer concrete using this fly ash and the other ingredients which is available locally. Potassium Hydroxide and sodium Hydroxide solution were used as alkali activators in different mix proportions. The actual compressive strength of the concrete depends on various parameters such as the ratio of the activator solution to fly ash, molarity of the alkaline solution, ratio of the activator chemicals, curing temperature etc. The amount of the carbon dioxide released during the manufacture of OPC due to the calcinations of limestone and combustion of fossil fuel is in the order of one ton for every ton of OPC produced. In addition, the extent of energy required to produce OPC is only next to steel and aluminum. Attempts to reduce the use of Portland cement in concrete are receiving much attention due to environment-related. Fly ash -based Geopolymer concrete is a ‘new’ material that does not need the presence of Portland cement as a binder. The role of Portland cement is replaced by low calcium fly ash. Geopolymer is an inorganic alumino-Hydroxide polymer synthesized from predominantly silicon (Si) and aluminum (Al) materials of geological origin or byproduct materials such as fly ash. The term Geopolymer was introduced to represent the mineral polymers resulting from geochemistry. The process involves a chemical reaction under highly alkaline conditions on Si-Al minerals, yielding polymeric Si-O-Al-O bonds in amorphous form.

  • Sustainability in Civil Engineering

Session Introduction

Jimyoung Lee

University of Marketing and Distribution Sciences, Japan

Title: Business Models for the Last Mile Logistics of Supply Chain Management in a Hyper-aged Society
Biography:

Jimyoung Lee completed a doctoral course of Applied Marine Environmental Studies with a specialty of logistics in 2008 at Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Japan. She has been an Associate Professor in University of Marketing and Distribution Sciences, Japan, and currently a Visiting Fellow at University of New South Wales, Australia. She has published many papers in journals of logistics and maritime transport.

Abstract:

New issues of restricted shoppers have been under the spotlight in a hyper-aged society of Japan. The restricted shoppers refer to those who have difficulties in daily shopping. They are mainly derived from the decreases in the number of neighborhood stores and public transport since the population of the society has been ageing and even decreasing. The elderly people cannot easily access to stores nor handle their goods because of their physical features. Since a supply chain management has a mission to secure necessaries to the final customers, the last mile logistics should be significantly taken into consideration in a hyper-aged society. With pointing out the involvement of financial support as a social welfare system, recent studies have showed some measures such as rolling stores and home-delivery service. Profitable business models, however, are an essential element for the last mile logistics in order to guarantee the continuous measures for the restricted shoppers. This research addresses the issue of the restricted shoppers in a hyper-aged society and introduces some measures taking place in Japan focusing on the supply chain management. Further necessary efforts are also discussed. It is expected to share the ideas since world population has been ageing.

  • Architecture and Urban Planning

Session Introduction

Markku Karjalainen

Tampere University of Technology, Finland

Title: Multi-Story Timber Frame Buildings in Finland
Biography:

Markku Karjalainen is an Architect (1988), D.Sc. (Tech.) (2002), Docent of timber construction and wood architecture (2008) and Associate professor (Architectural Construction) at the Tampere University of Technology (TTY), School of Architecture (2015 –). He has been advancing Finnish large-scale industrial timber construction (multi-story timber apartment buildings, wooden public buildings, wooden halls, and wooden bridges) full time for the past 20 years

Abstract:

Every year, Finland’s forests grow and produce more than 105 million cubic metres of wood and some 65 per cent of this is utilised. The utilisation of wood could be significantly increased (by approximately 20 million cubic metres per year) through, for example, use for bioenergy, for construction purposes, and in the wood-product industry. Residential buildings account for more than 65 per cent of Finland’s building stock. The greatest potential for growth in wood construction lies in the building of multi story structures, public buildings, and hall-like buildings; energy-efficiency upgrades to the façades of existing suburban concrete blocks of flats; construction of additional storeys; and in-fill developments. Wood as a local, renewable, and environment-friendly energy source and construction material of domestic origin will be an increasingly competitive raw material. In Europe, Finland is second to Spain in the ratio of blocks of flats to population: some 44 per cent of all residences in Finland are in multi-story buildings. Concrete has dominated the multi-story building market for the past 60 years. Wood-based construction has undergone intense development in Finland since the early 1990s, through close co-operation with other EU countries. Development efforts have focused particularly on building of multi-story wooden buildings. According to the fire codes currently in force in Finland, residential buildings and office premises with a wooden frame and façade can be built to eight storeys. The cross-laminated timber (CLT) technique is becoming more common in multi-story timber frame buildings’ construction in Finland.

  • Civil and Structural Engineering

Session Introduction

Ashok J. Shah

Sardar Vallavbhai National Insitute of Technology, India

Title: Study of steel plate shear wall using ETAB
Biography:

Mr. A J Shah has completed his M. E. (CIVIL) specialization in Structure in 1985 from S. G. U., Gujarat, India. He is the Associate Professor of Applied Mechanics Department. He has published more than 16 papers Journal & International Conference.

Abstract:

Unstiffened steel plate walls are effective and economical system to resist lateral load due to earthquake ad wind forces in the steel structures, which have attracted the structural engineer’s interests widely during the last decade. Steel plate walls also provide major stiffness against building drift for the hi-rise buildings. This paper provides an introduction to SPSW system and its performance against lateral loads. The analysis of 20-story high-rise steel buildings frames with steel plate shear walls (SPSWs) is carried out using ETABS program considering orthotropic membrane modelling technique has been proposed in “AISC Steel Design Guide 20”. The primary variable in the analysis are thickness of plate, aspect ratio and configuration of wall. Finally, the effect of changes in web plate variables (thickness, aspect ratio, and configuration) on the behaviour of SPSW boundary element (HBE, VBE) and overall building frame is studied, which is illustrated in this study. From the result obtained it is observed that, the bending moments are reduced with the use of steel shear walls in the buildings. There is a little effect on the bending moments and shear forces of the beams with the increase of shear wall thickness and a small decrease in the lateral deflections. With increase of aspect ratio the storey drift increases while bending moment and shear force shown a considerable increase. configurations of shear wall panels is compared with that of bare frame, the zigzag shear wall configuration is found to be better than the other systems studied in controlling the response to lateral loading.

  • Civil Engineering Design

Session Introduction

Satish N Desai

Sardar Vallavbhai National Insitute of Technology, India

Title: Service life prediction model for chlorine induced reinforced concrete structure
Biography:

Dr Satish N Desai completed his PhD at SVNIT.(This institute is a central government institution of INDIA, and also considered as institute of national importance). He is the Professor of Applied Mechanics Department since 40 years. He has published more than 05 papers in International journals and more than 10 papers in national conference.

Abstract:

Durability is one of the major challenges in front of researchers and industrialist especially for the case of structures which are directly exposed to the marine environment under chloride attach. The present work proposes some modified relations between the factors which directly or indirectly effect the corrosion of reinforcement. Prediction of time to corrosion is the key element in evaluation the service life of RCC structures. In present work we have critically reviewed number of empirical, analytical models to predict time to corrosion and propagation. Service life has been modified in to three stages 1) Initiation 2) Propagation time and 3) Time to strength reduction. Fick’s law has been used for predicting time to corrosion based on apparent diffusion coefficient which has been considered as time variant function. By adopting available data from the published journals we have obtained the relation between different variables which have been further used in the model proposed by vu et al 2005 to modify the propagation time; which has been considered as the time at which crack propagation reaches to its limiting value. And it was observed that even after the end of propagation time structure can behave structurally stable in few cases therefore ‘time to strength reduction’ has been introduced as the additive of former two. During this structure is expected to undergo further corrosion which may result to reduction in strength of concrete which leads to end of service life. Rate of corrosion has been introduced as time variant function; which depends on corrosion current density. And corrosion current density has been found depending on many variables there for multiple regression analysis has been used to obtain relationship. Service life prediction models have been proposed for two different cases 1) General corrosion model 2) Pitting corrosion model under five different exposure conditions. Concrete covers, bar diameter, water to cement ratio and exposure conditions are major factors which affect the service life. MATLAB code was developed for modelling of service life based on proposed model. Monte-Carlo simulation technique has been used to obtain set of data for all possible cases to understand the behaviour of service life of reinforced concrete structures with respect to variables involved in it. Concrete covers, bar diameter and w/c ratios have been found to be important variables which affect service life. Fly ash and silica fume also plays an important role in Initiation and propagation time; which increase the service life.

  • Civil and Environmental Engineering
Biography:

Dr. (Mrs.) Khambete A. K. have more than 35 years of teaching and industrial experience in the field of environmental engineering. She has worked as a expert and director on various government as well semi government bodies of environmental descipline. She also have a command over Fuzzy logic system approach towards environmental monitoring systems (EMS). More than 20 publications are there at national as well as international level on various practical approach towards EMS.

Abstract:

The health of city is massively influenced by its sanitation facilities and the way of maintaining the hygienic life of population. Sewage treatment plants (STPs) plays a vital role in the municipal hygiene. For developing countries, parameters like inadequate funds, longstanding technology, deficit technical manpower and ignorance towards operations and maintenance etc. causes to reduce efficiency of sewage treatment plants. According to Vandeweerd et al. (1997), more than 90% of sewerage in the developing world is discharged directly into rivers, lakes, and coastal waters; and breaking down of STPs also contribute in this discharge. At present there is no any method being adopted to evaluate the efficiency of STPs. The Fuzzy Multi Criteria Decision Making (FMCDM) approach helps to rank when there are ‘n’ no of criterions to evaluate the ‘j’ no of objects. FMCDM approach also helps to simulate when there is a need of upholding the situations. The present research work is carried out in the state of Gujrat of India. Total six STPs having nearly equal treatment capacity were selected to inspect. The performance was monitored on the basis of temperature, Total Dissolved Solids (TDS), Suspended Solids (SS), Biological and Chemical Oxygen Demand (BOD and COD), Oil and Grease, pH and Chlorides. The monitoring, sampling and characterization was carried out as per APHA standards and for raw as well as treated sewage. Applying FMCDM Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) the efficiency has been evaluated. Out of six the one at Bamroli has identified as rank I with efficiency of 96%.

  • Sustainability in Geotechnical engineering

Session Introduction

Atul K Desai

Sardar Vallavbhai National Insitute of Technology, India

Title: Innovation in Turbo-Generator Frame foundation, an Experimental and Analytical study
Biography:

Dr. Atul K Desai has completed his PhD at SVNIT.(This institute is a central government institution of INDIA, and also considered as institute of national importance). He is the Professor of Applied Mechanics Department since 33 years. He has published more than 100 papers in International journals and more than 50 papers in international conference.

Abstract:

Turbo Generator Frame Foundation is very important for all types of power plants viz. Gas, Steam, Hydro, Geothermal and nuclear Power Plants.The turbo-generator is the main part of a power plant. Turbo-generator is generally mounted on the top deck of the foundation. In this work, Structure Interaction (SBSI) has been studied by conducting experiments and numerical analysis in SAP; 2000 software. A Barrette is a cast-in-place reinforced concrete column. The role of the Soil-Barrette-Structure Interaction (SBSI) is advantageous to the Turbo-Generator Foundation system under seismic loading because it transfers seismic loading through columns to Barrettes Experimental tests have been conducted for three different cases, namely: (i )Turbo Generator Foundation supported by Raft on medium dense sand, (ii) Turbo Generator Foundation supported by pile in medium dense sand, (iii) Turbo Generator Foundation supported by Barrettes in medium dense sand. In addition to the experiments, SAP; 2000 has been used for comparison of results of above three cases. Results are plotted in terms of the structural response parameters such as Displacement in Top deck at seismic loading places, comparison of frequency and acceleration. Comparison of the numerical results and the experimental data shows a good agreement confirming the reliability of the numerical model. Both experimental and numerical results reveals that Soil-Barrette-Structure Interaction decreases displacement of top deck at lateral direction and frequency comparison to raft and pile structures

  • Transportation Engineering

Session Introduction

Kam Tara

Urban Research and Planning Pty Ltd, Australia

Title: Smart City Design Principles and TOD
Biography:

Dr Kam Tara is the Director of Urban Research and Planning (URaP International) and a Director of URaP-TTW Pty. He has worked for private consultants and government bodies both in Australia and overseas. He is a graduate of University of Kentucky with a Master of Engineering (Honours) in transportation form University of Wollongong and a doctorate from Macquarie University, School of Economic and Financial Studies. Dr Tara is the author of over 150 technical studies most of which have been subject to public exhibition or technical review. Dr Tara has also been nominated as an expert advisor to Nanshan Planning Bureau, Shenzhen, China where he has judged major international competition on built environment and urban development projects. Most recently, he has been involved in policy development and capacity building mainly associated with Indonesia and China and contributing in various infrastructure policy and projects development schemes.

Abstract:

The talk aims to provide an overview of elements that are associated with the urban environment in order to achieve “smart city” objectives while maintaining the ‘sense of a place’ together with its practicality and financial feasibility. “Smart cities” are the current planning mantra in many parts of the world and we aim to provide an overview of elements that are associated with the urban environment. Fieldwork and interviews in Japan has led the authors to formulate five elements: accessibility, amenity, axis, affordability and ancestry. Using case studies of cities in Japan we apply principles of adaptability and applicability to critically assess the relevance of some of these elements as they relate to movements of goods and people and urban character in these high-density areas.

Biography:

Dr. Rakesh Kumar, a graduate in Civil Engineering, post-graduate & Doctorate from IITDelhi in Sustainable Engineering, have around 20 years of professional experience in the field of Transportation & Highway Engineering. He is interested in factors that lead to a more efficient, equitable and sustainable Urban and Regional optimal Highway construction and evaluation with NDT. His expertise is in Pavement investigation and various rehabilitation techniques. He works on different goal oriented research projects funded by Department of science of Technology (DST), Ministry of Science and Technology, GOI. He has published more than 50 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of reputed journals.

Abstract:

The motorized three wheelers are one of the main modes of urban Indian roads. In this context, this paper aims to develop the driving usage pattern of intercity shared auto rickshaw using V-box. The driving uses data was collected in three regions central business districts (CBD), developed land use pattern and developing land use pattern at morning, evening peak hour and in the free flow conditions. The real-time travel attributes such as speed, time, and acceleration, dynamically related were estimated. The time-space data was obtained for thirty samples trips for each type of study roads. The velocity of each trip for a single second was compared with the maximum probability of all the repeated velocity values. The likelihood of all the accelerations and rate of change of acceleration was found, and velocity value having a greater probability of acceleration or rate of change of acceleration was selected for the representative driving cycle. The driving pattern constructed using micro trip approach, with consideration of acceleration, cruising, deceleration and idling characteristics. The study has revealed that irrespective of road type, time periods and desired distance, duration and peak hours, a high percentage of driving time was spent in accelerating and decelerating phase. The three wheelers average running speed, and the average speed was estimated about 10 km/h and 11.30 km/h respectively in the arterial CBD. In the developed region, determined running and average speed as 21.88 km/h and 26.8 km/h respectively. The three-wheeler 95th percentile speed was calculated as 29 km/h for developing region with average running speed and average speed 29.67 km/h to 40 km/h respectively. In developing the region, acceleration and deceleration were estimated 34.42% and 37.57% respectively, and idling and cruising 5.13%, 22.88% respectively for the typical arterial road. The developed driving cycle was also compared with Indian standard driving cycle, which helped to get the usages pattern in typical Indian City.